Why are we falling for the great vinyl scam?
#91
@DSJR... Have I missed the point though?

Hi-Fi, short for 'high fidelity' ..... A quick Google gives a number of references all of which focus on the best and most accurate reproduction of music,... Rather than 'low fidelity' music for the masses.

On that basis, I think I make a pretty valid point.... When a phone is effectively now the highest fidelity source available... (Other than hiring a live band to play in your living room) ....why spend a small or large sum on an unecessary source that makes things sound 'lower fidelity'?

It's like tending a beautiful garden.... Then paying someone to put random weeds in, that you then spend ages trying to remove again.

Look, it's horses for courses, and it's OK to be nostalgic.... I didn't mean to offend, and if it gives you pleasure then that's great.
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#92
I'm with you True Blue.
Some days it just isn’t worth the hassle of chewing through the restraints......
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#93
Ive been listening to a lot of Satchmo recently
His 5 decade career produced many vibrant recordings of glorious music
ITunes has remastered many and found alternate takes etc for me,many are quite sublime
No record player in the world could provide a play list like that
Roger
The 10s excel at this sort of music
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#94
Interesting video from the engineer who mastered/cut the new stereo version of Sgt. Pepper's. Seems to suggest that CDs are routinely mastered LOOOOOOUD! (As he puts it.) And that they take their foot of the gas with vinyl to achieve better sound.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4fN3vR7_qE&sns=tw

Seems if they edged off a bit on the digital side there may not be such perceived differences. Still like and use vinyl. And the new stereo version of Sgt. Pepper's on CD sounds quite remarkable to my ears in any case (despite the protestations of the drama queens on other forums). The two pals I played it to on Saturday were wowed by it as well.
Malcolm 
Digital:  Roon / Tidal > Raspberry Pi with Roon Bridge > Meridian Explorer 2; Pioneer BDP-450 for SACD/DVD-A/Blu-ray
Analogue: Technics SL-1210 / Timestep PSU / SME 309 / Denon DL-304 / Trichord Dino 2
Yamaha RX-v1067 / B&W 804s, HTM4s and CDM CNT
Panasonic PT-AT6000 projector
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#95
Itunes has the remastered Pepper @£14.99
30 tracks in all
The outakes are fascinating but the remix of Pepper from the unbounced 4 tracks is astonishing
Roger
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#96
(2017-06-05, 18:57:33)m10 Wrote: Interesting video from the engineer who mastered/cut the new stereo version of Sgt. Pepper's.  Seems to suggest that CDs are routinely mastered LOOOOOOUD! (As he puts it.)  And that they take their foot of the gas with vinyl to achieve better sound.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4fN3vR7_qE&sns=tw

Seems if they edged off a bit on the digital side there may not be such perceived differences.  Still like and use vinyl.  And the new stereo version of Sgt. Pepper's on CD sounds quite remarkable to my ears in any case (despite the protestations of the drama queens on other forums).  The two pals I played it to on Saturday were wowed by it as well.


All he says is that there is no need to limit the vinyl master. It is nothing to do with achieving a better sound. It is to do with what the cutting head can cope with. He mentions gentle limiting for the CD master. This will be inaudible given his credentials as a mastering engineer. I have yet to hear the remastered album but I am looking forward to it.
Then you ask why I don't live here, Honey, how come you have to ask me that?
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#97
I have the Apple USB release of the previous "definitive" remastering of all the Beatles albums. I have been wondering how this 50th anniversary release is different. The above video and an associated Abbey Road video go some way to explaining the how - so thank you for the link. They have gone back to the source tapes and have not used the bounce tapes. Working on a single album gives time to get this right, I presume. There is an interesting comment about getting the tape speeds matched because the stereo release was different to the mono. The mono release was used as the reference because, originally, much more time was spent on the mono release. Varispeed was used for many of the Beatles recordings, from what I have read (Revolution In The Head, Ian MacDonald) so it is not too surprising that they needed to do this.

Excellent videos from dedicated experts.
Then you ask why I don't live here, Honey, how come you have to ask me that?
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#98
direct objective head-to-head data between LP and digital

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